Dry-fire and Home Defense

Range practice is becoming difficult. Even with ammo prices skyrocketing and the mere absence of common calibers on the store shelves may preclude your range practice as well – even if you’re a pro-gun billionaire who can afford the high prices,

One common training methodology is dry-firing. I have been trying to implement this in my training more. Along with learning my home and it’s potential defenses.

Dryfire is the practice of performing a technique (be it aiming, drawing, reloads, etc) with anunloaded firearm.   The repetition helps to build muscle memory &  improve your technique.  It is highly recommended by experts for those who are wanting to practice and improve their skills as a shooter.

Always, always, check your firearm. Make sure it is unloaded. Then if you are able, place your ammo in a seperate location from where you practice OR lock it up.  This way there is little chance of confusion.

Here are some photos that I took. They are staged as I was using an automated timer on my camera to take the pictures in order to avoid pointing the firearm at anything I do not want to destroy (like a photographer).   But I did the actions so as to imitate the dry-firing I had been practicing involving drawing and re-holstering.

http://www.nugun.org/photos/nugun_2009_04_bedroom/

  1.  I would grip the sidearm with strong hand and simultaneously place my weak hand to my chest.
       
  2.  Draw the sidearm from the holster and rotate 90 degrees to be pointing toward the target.
    (This is in fact the first position in which one becomes able to fire the gun on target.)
       
  3. Move sidearm toward my center and bring my weak hand onto it in order to secure a strong two handed grip.  (This too is a shootable position.)
     
  4. Extend arms to preferred shooting position, while keeping sights level and trained on target.
Advertisements
Published in: on April 23, 2009 at 10:49 pm  Comments (6)  
Tags: , , ,

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://nugun.wordpress.com/2009/04/23/dry-fire-and-home-defense/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

6 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. One thing I’ve incorporated during my draw is to take two steps to the side during the draw process. From what I’ve heard, most self defense encounters occur at very short range and you may not have anything to duck down behind as you do behind your bed in that one series (although that’s a good technique to practice too…not dismissing it, only saying that you could add to your toolbox). Moving to the side during the draw will make it more difficult for an attacker to score a hit on you while you’re presenting your firearm.

    Also, if you carry concealed at all, you should practice drawing from concealment as well. That should become as automatic as you can make it because you’ll be rushing under stress and it will be difficult to make a clean draw if it’s not simply a muscle memory reaction.

    I’m not criticizing…this is a good post and makes excellent points. I’m just trying to add to, not detract from.

  2. I’ve actually never been a big fan of dry-fire exercises. Actually, it scares the shit out of me. Draw and point? Ok. But squeeze the trigger with no bang? I don’t think that is a good habit to get into. For example, look at the stupid schmuck who was doing house clearing exercises and ‘accidentally’ shot his fiancee.

    I want my brain to know that when that trigger is squeezed the gun goes bang and something gets destroyed.

  3. I have a dumb question. Are you practicing for home defense or match shooting?

    I also agree that this is a good post and the pictures to go with it illustrate your point perfectly.

    My problem is that you are using what looks like an outside the waistband holster. Now I know that you PA folks have a much different set of rules than those of us who live in the wrong side of the delaware, but do you walk around your home open carry? My wife would kill me if I strapped on my gun when I got home from work. For me what I want to work on is picking the firearm up from a table (or nightstand) slapping in a magazine and racking the slide.

  4. @Sailorcurt

    VERY GOOD INSIGHTS, ALL SHOULD READ HIS COMMENT ABOVE>

    “One thing I’ve incorporated during my draw is to take two steps to the side during the draw process.”

    Good insight…and actually I remember reading that there is a particular side you want to step to. One side when facing right hand shooters, and another for left. As it increases your chances of moving out of the line of fire.

    Also, such is a really good practice when practicing tap/rack/shoot drills. Instead of just standing there for a second or two being an easy target.

    Very much agree that one needs to practice with their carry routine. And all the steps involved in be ready and able to react.

  5. @LibertyNews

    “Actually, it scares the shit out of me. Draw and point? Ok. But squeeze the trigger with no bang? I don’t think that is a good habit to get into”

    The use of any fire arm involves risks which must be handled safely through best practices.

    In fact, I believe SIG offers replica AirSoft guns for a number of their models. There are also replicas of Glocks and 1911s. Many of these are designed to weigh the same as the models they replicate.

    Thus one can potentially dry-fire with zero risk. I truly wish that more manufacturers offered training replicas with the exact same trigger but non-firing or AirSoft systems.

    “For example, look at the stupid schmuck who was doing house clearing exercises and ‘accidentally’ shot his fiancee.”

    Yes, that was extremely stupid. And I am not sure if something more was involved. It’s hard to believe the scenario that happened with that. It was one of the most tragic things I’ve read.

    That said, we have incidents where homes blow up from boilers. People drive their cars into another car and kill four people. Humans do stupid things. But that does not necessarily make the action stupid in and of itself. Driving is not stupid. Driving and not paying attention to what you’re doing and driving recklessly or drunk – is stupid.

    “I want my brain to know that when that trigger is squeezed the gun goes bang and something gets destroyed.”

    But what if you pull the trigger but miss because you haven’t been able to train. What if you don’t even manage to unholster your firearm due to lack of practice.

    ***

    All that said, I don’t feel there is anything wrong with LibertyNews’ decision. Gun ownership and use is a very personal thing. As long as LibertyNews has reasoned out why or why not he is doing something. Than I think he’s made a good decision.

    Now I might try reasoning with him to lean him toward my viewpoint (as I did above).

    Lastly, I think there are plenty of dry-fire practices that can be done without ever pulling the trigger. Simple unholstering and aiming can be practiced and never require you to put your finger on your trigger.

  6. @Jeremy

    “I have a dumb question. Are you practicing for home defense or match shooting?”

    A little of both…

    I have a nylon IWB holster that I usually use for carrying in cross draw fashion.

    However, I picked up a Fobus kydex holster for a local competition. I was experimenting with it’s use, as I was also contemplating evaluating it for CCW purposes. (Which you can read about in my 2A Rally Part IV segment.)

    https://nugun.wordpress.com/2009/04/22/2nd-amendment-rally-part-iv-fobus-review/

    And yes, Pennsylvania allows for open-carry. Though you might get hassled in certain areas.

    “but do you walk around your home open carry?”
    On occasion…but usually concealed.

    I am presently searching for the right holster system for me. I am not satisfied with either option I presently have. In winter, I could get away with the Fobus under a jacket. But it’s looking like the warmer weather precludes such.

    “My wife would kill me if I strapped on my gun when I got home from work.”

    My wife is pretty pro-gun. And pro-individual rights. She’d probably flip out if any of our neighbors criticized me for OC in our house or yard. She’d probably go on a tirade that it was none-of-their-business. *lol*

    Criminals be aware…my wife has the sharper teeth!!! *LOL*

    ***

    “For me what I want to work on is picking the firearm up from a table (or nightstand) slapping in a magazine and racking the slide”

    That’s a very good practice. Some tips I’ve learned from some of the classes I’ve taken.

    1. Set the gun down so that you can grab it with strong hand.
    2. Practice loading magazine by placing the rear flat side against the grip, and sliding in with a good hearty push.

    I tend to leave the magazine in the sidearm, but without chambering a round. Than I just need to rack the slide. I think this is a good middle ground. The gun is not ready to shoot. But I don’t have to worry about fumbling with a magazine in the dark. Where as training can benefit racking the slide as all parts are always in exact relation to each other. So it can easily be burned into muscle memory.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: